Red Seal Trades

Carpenter

NOC: 7271
Designation Year: 1959

The Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program
 
The Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program


Carpenters construct, renovate and repair residential, civil, institutional, commercial and industrial (ICI) structures made of wood, steel, concrete and other materials.

They can work for a wide array of employers, including new home builders and renovation firms, construction firms, building owners, property managers and tenants, building developers and government departments. Some carpenters are union members and a significant number are self-employed.

While the scope of the carpenter trade includes many aspects of building construction, a growing number of carpenters work for contractors who specialize in such areas of trade practice as concrete forming, framing, finishing, interior systems and renovation. Carpenters are employed in a variety of job environments, including houses under construction or renovation, ICI and infrastructure projects, and plants that pre-fabricate buildings. They must be prepared to work in a variety of working environments.

Safety is of prime importance to all carpenters. In addition to typical risks of injury resulting from slips and falls, falling objects and the use of hand and power tools, carpenters must be aware of constantly changing work surroundings to mitigate the chance of injury to self and others. The proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE) and related training is very important to carpenters regardless of their location of work. Risk/hazard assessments prior to performing tasks are necessary and important.

Some important competencies of a carpenter are good knowledge of mathematics, the ability to use metric and imperial measurements, an understanding of building science, communication and problem solving skills, and the ability to work independently or as part of a team. Other skills present in a competent carpenter are the ability to work at heights, the ability to stand or kneel for long periods of time, manual dexterity and good balance. Carpentry is a physically demanding occupation requiring the lifting of heavy tools and materials. Journeyperson carpenters are expected to mentor apprentices given the hands-on nature of the trade.

This analysis recognizes similarities and overlaps with the work of other tradespersons such as roofers, lathers (interior systems mechanics), drywall finisher and plasterers, floorcovering installers, concrete finishers, ironworkers (reinforcing) and cabinetmakers. Experienced carpenters may advance to supervisory positions, or become independent contractors, due to their involvement in most aspects of building construction.

Provincial Certification

Please note that the abbreviations for the provinces use the Canada Post standard.

 NL   NS   PE   NB   QC   ON   MB   SK   AB   BC   NT   YT   NU 
Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Trade Information

Please note that all NOAs published after April 2012 will only be available electronically.

HTML PDF Order
National Occupational Analysis (NOA) (NEW NOA - Exam under development) Check Mark Check Mark
(1315 kb)
National Occupational Analysis (NOA) (NOA that the current Exam is based on) Check Mark Check Mark
(614 kb)
Ellis Chart Check Mark

Additional Information

HTML PDF JPEG Order
Cover page NOA
Exam Counselling Sheet Check Mark
Local Trade Names
Essential Skills Profile Check Mark
Interprovincial Program Guide (IPG) Check Mark Check Mark (366 kb)
Cover page IPG
Job Market Information
Sector Council
Selection of the Check Mark will link to the specified product.

To access the Portable Document Format (PDF) version you must have a PDF reader installed. If you do not already have such a reader, there are numerous PDF readers available for free download or for purchase on the Internet:

To view the RTF version, use the document conversion features available in most word processing software, or use a file viewer capable of reading RTF.

Date modified: