Red Seal Trades

Industrial Mechanic (Millwright)

NOC: 7311
Designation Year: 1964

The Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program
 
The Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program


Industrial mechanics (millwrights) work on industrial machinery and mechanical equipment and components. This equipment may include mechanical, pneumatic, hydraulic, fuel, lubrication, cooling and exhaust systems and equipment. Some components worked on include pumps, fans, tanks, conveyors, presses, generators, and pneumatic and hydraulic controls.

Industrial mechanics (millwrights) are responsible for assembling, installing, aligning, maintaining, repairing, troubleshooting, inspecting, dismantling and moving this machinery and equipment. Troubleshooting may include diagnosing irregularities and malfunctions, making adjustments, and repairing or replacing parts. Cleaning, adjusting and lubricating machinery are also important maintenance tasks of this trade.

Other tasks that may be performed in this trade include welding, cutting, rigging and machining as required. Industrial mechanics (millwrights) may prepare bases for equipment.

Prints, diagrams, schematic drawings and manuals assist industrial mechanics (millwrights) in determining work procedures.

Industrial mechanics (millwrights) work with a wide variety of tools. They may use hand and power tools in installation and repair work. Larger machine tools such as lathes, drill presses and grinders may be used in fabrication of machine parts. Hoisting and lifting equipment such as cranes, jacks and forklifts is commonly used to position large machines or machine parts.

Industrial mechanics (millwrights) are employed in all sectors of industry that involve mechanical moving equipment including mining, petrochemical, power generation, service and food processing among others. Millwrights are involved with the installation, maintenance and repair of machinery, equipment and components.

The work environment for industrial mechanics (millwrights) is varied and may involve working in extreme or adverse conditions. They often work shift work. They may work in confined spaces, at heights, with heavy equipment and around moving machinery. The work often requires considerable standing, kneeling and lifting of materials.

Key skills for people in this trade are mechanical aptitude, problem-solving, communication, job planning and organizing and the ability to use trade-related calculations. They have the ability to detect malfunctions through sensory tests which are often confirmed by technical tests. Other important attributes include good coordination, manual dexterity and the ability to visualize a layout in three dimensions.

Industrial mechanics (millwrights) often possess overlapping skills with other tradespeople such as steamfitter/pipefitter, industrial instrument mechanic, power engineer, welder, machinist or industrial electrician. They may be certified in these other trades as well. Industrial mechanics (millwrights) may work in specialized areas of the trade such as fluid analysis, vibration analysis and laser alignment. With experience, they may advance to other positions such as mentor, supervisor, planner, superintendent or trainer.

Provincial Certification

Please note that the abbreviations for the provinces use the Canada Post standard.

 NL   NS   PE   NB   QC   ON   MB   SK   AB   BC   NT   YT   NU 
Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Trade Information

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Additional Information

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