CCDA 2013 Annual Report

Table of Contents

Message from the Chair

Chairman Joe Rudderham

2013 marked the beginning of the Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship’s (CCDA’s) new three-year strategic plan, Strategic Directions 2013–2016. This plan set forward specific initiatives in four priority areas:

  • Standards and Assessments
  • Harmonization
  • Promotion
  • Engagement

I am pleased to present the 2013 Annual Report detailing the work and progress on each of the CCDA’s strategic priorities. It takes considerable cooperation and effort among all jurisdictions and national stakeholders in order to advance this very important work. At its base, the CCDA has a long and impressive history in developing common training and certification standards. This rich history continues to remind all apprenticeship stakeholders of the value of collaborating with a focus on the needs of industry and the labour market.

Over this past year, the Strengthening the Red Seal initiative focused on establishing enhanced standard pilots in two trades: Construction Electrician and Steamfitter/Pipefitter. In spring/summer 2013, a national industry advisory committee for each pilot trade was established to provide valuable input at each step of the standard’s development process. In fall/winter 2013, the CCDA explored options to improve Red Seal assessment models. Building on the enhanced standard, the CCDA looked at how it can optimize the existing multiple-choice examination to ensure it continues to provide an assurance of quality for industry. Options could include the requirement to demonstrate competence in key aspects of the trade. The assessment model could also include new elements such as practical tests, providing a broad and rigorous set of opportunities for workers to demonstrate competency. The CCDA will continue to work closely with the industry advisory committees to create an assessment model that is practical for their trades.

In early 2013 it became clear that harmonization of Red Seal program delivery (training and certification) was at the top of the priority list for industries in Canada. National and P/T industry stakeholders clearly indicated the need to bring greater consistency in how apprenticeship training is delivered in the provinces and territories to enhance and improve the mobility of apprentices across jurisdictions. To this end the CCDA initiated a review of the similarities and inconsistencies of program elements in 10 trades across the provinces and territories. Initial results revealed significant differences in completion requirements (e.g. technical training and work hours required) and more specifically, inconsistencies in technical training sequencing and content emphasis. This research will allow CCDA and industry to determine where harmonization efforts will be placed.

New Red Seal branding and stakeholder engagement activities rounded off the priority activities in 2013. Most significant was the launch of the new brand at the Skills Canada Competition in Vancouver in June. As well, the CCDA Stakeholder Relations Committee held its annual meeting in March 2013. At this meeting, national stakeholders endorsed the four strategic priorities and clearly indicated the need for continuous and purposeful contact with all associated stakeholders.

Key to the success of the CCDA is the participation of the Interprovincial Alliance of Apprenticeship Board Chairs (IPA). The IPA continues to make a significant contribution to the work of the CCDA and its committees. The IPA provides an industry voice and advice to ensure the Red Seal remains responsive and continues to be recognized as a standard of excellence for working professionals in the skilled trades.

As noted in last year’s message and worth repeating, “The Interprovincial Standards and Examination Committee (ISEC) continues to play an integral role in the Red Seal through the development of National Occupational Analyses, examinations and Interprovincial Program Guides, all while meeting a rigorous timeline identified in CCDA service standards. Along with gauging emerging industry trends, the ISEC works closely with industry in developing these Red Seal products to ensure that the Red Seal continues to represent excellence in the skilled trades across Canada. The committee’s work in product development ensures that the products tradespeople see and use reflect the current needs of industry.”

On behalf of the CCDA, I would like to take this opportunity to thank all stakeholders involved in making the Red Seal Program a standard of excellence. This CCDA partnership works because of industry’s involvement and commitment to continuous improvement. Specifically I want to recognize the essential contribution (staff and funding resources) of Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). ESDC’s participation and assistance continues to foster a high level of P/T collaboration and is essential in making significant progress in the Red Seal Program.

On a next to final note I would like to thank and recognize all the work done by Dan Mills, former Chair of CCDA and Director of Apprenticeship in New Brunswick, and all the CCDA colleagues who moved on in their respective jurisdictions. Each brought wonderful perspective and knowledge to the CCDA table.

It has been my pleasure to assume the acting role of Chair of CCDA in December 2013 and I look forward to continuing to work with industry, the provinces and territories (P/T), the IPA, and ESDC colleagues in 2014.

Background Information

Introduction

The 2013 CCDA Annual Report features the activities, products and accomplishments of the past year in the management of the Red Seal Program and the execution of its priorities. (See Appendix B for the priorities in CCDA Strategic Directions 2013–2016.)

This report demonstrates that the CCDA is committed to continuously moving forward with its priorities and building upon them to achieve a more formalized and measurable strategic direction.

The Red Seal Program

For more than 50 years, the Red Seal Program has helped to harmonize trades training and certification to a common standard that is developed and recognized by industry across Canada. The program was initially established by the provincial, territorial and federal governments to develop industry-defined Canadian standards to facilitate the mobility of certified skilled workers across Canada. Today, the Red Seal endorsement is widely recognized and respected by industry as a standard of excellence for the skilled trades.

Obtaining a Red Seal endorsement is evidence that a tradesperson has met the Canadian standard for his/her trade and facilitates recognition of his/her certification across Canada. Upon successful completion of a Red Seal examination, the endorsement is affixed to the provincial or territorial trade certificate. The endorsement provides both employers and consumers with assurance and confidence that tradespeople they hire are skilled and knowledgeable. A Red Seal endorsement is an employment advantage that opens doors to job opportunities.

The Red Seal Program is administered in each province and territory by their apprenticeship authorities under the guidance of the CCDA. This council is a partnership between the federal, provincial and territorial governments. The CCDA is composed of all provincial and territorial administrators responsible for apprenticeship in Canada and two representatives from Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC). The program provides common Canadian standards and tools for the apprenticeship authority in each jurisdiction while recognizing that apprenticeship training and trade certification are the responsibilities of each province and territory.

Operating Environment

Almost five years into the recovery from the global recession, the Canadian economy has continued to expand, albeit at a modest pace. Economic growth has been restrained by weak export markets, declines in crude oil and other commodity prices, as well as sustained softness in domestic inflation since early 2012. Real GDP growth is projected to pick up from 1.8 percent in 2013 to 2.5 percent in both 2014 and 2015.

Employment growth lowered the unemployment rate to 7 percent in January 2014. Skills and labour shortages are re-emerging in certain sectors and regions, including skilled trades sectors such as mining, oil and gas extraction and construction. These skills shortages will be exacerbated by new and on-going megaprojects, which stimulate skilled trades employment. Mobility will be critical to meet the construction industry’s needs over the next five years. In some key markets, special skills and experience are in short supply, while in other regions there are employment losses as major projects wind down.

There are many challenges and pressures facing apprenticeship systems and the Red Seal Program. These include an aging workforce, stakeholder concerns about skills shortages (especially in particular regions, sectors or occupations), and limited employer participation in apprenticeship. Other challenges include youth not seeing the trades as a first choice career, barriers to apprenticeship completion, and different training and certification requirements across the country, which could impede the seamless mobility of apprentices. The CCDA strives to ensure that the Red Seal Program continues to be responsive to labour market needs.

The Canadian Council of Directors of Apprenticeship (CCDA)

Mandate and Objectives

The CCDA has the custodial authority and is responsible for the management and delivery of the Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program. The CCDA collaborates with industry and other regulatory authorities to facilitate the development of a skilled trades labour force and to facilitate the mobility of this labour force in Canada by means of a system of common interprovincial competency standards.

The CCDA, as a national collective of Directors of Apprenticeship, enables members to engage in research and evidence-based analysis that supports CCDA’s strategic directions, as well as the objectives and strategic directions of the members’ respective apprenticeship and trade certification systems and programs.

Purpose of the CCDA

The purpose of the CCDA is:

  • to provide a forum for inter-jurisdictional collaboration to facilitate the development of a certified, highly skilled and mobile trades workforce in Canada; and,
  • to provide a means by which decisions made by members about their respective apprenticeship and trade certification programs are informed by the most current and accurate evidence-based statistical analysis and research.

Governing Principles

The CCDA is committed to the following governing principles.

Engagement

  • Provide the opportunity for all members to participate fully in all aspects of the Red Seal Program.
  • Provide the opportunity for stakeholders to participate fully in defining common interprovincial standards for the skilled trades, as exemplified by the Red Seal Program.
  • Develop and maintain collaborative relationships with stakeholders on issues of common interest.

Transparency

  • Pursue its mandate in an open and transparent fashion towards its members and stakeholders.
  • Provide for means of communicating its decisions, activities and results to its members and stakeholders in a timely fashion.

Accountability

  • Be accountable to its members and stakeholders.

Decision-making

  • Provide for policy and direction that are guided by strong evidence-based analysis and supported by clear justification.

CCDA Logic Model and Performance Measurement

In 2013, the CCDA approved a new logic model for the Red Seal Program (see Appendix C). The logic model focuses on the CCDA’s main business lines, which represent the ongoing work to deliver the program:

  • Standards and Examinations Development and Maintenance;
  • Research; and
  • Communications and Engagement.

In addition to the CCDA’s business lines, work is underway on the CCDA’s strategic priorities, which are outlined in CCDA Strategic Directions 2013–2016.

The CCDA has developed several performance indicators to measure outcomes for its main business lines. Some targets have been set based on baseline data already available. Others will be set in 2014 once the baseline indicators have been developed for new performance measures. The CCDA has made the Performance Measurement Strategy as realistic as possible given that governments are under increasing fiscal pressures. The model also allows sufficient flexibility to focus on the CCDA’s strategic priorities, which build on the ongoing work to deliver the Red Seal Program.

The CCDA’s new performance measurement strategy is based upon this logic model. Both documents are available on the Red Seal website.

Key Results:

  • 64% of trade certificates issued in Red Seal trades in 2011 had a Red Seal endorsement (Target: 65% by 2016)
  • 78% of registered apprentices in 2011 were in Red Seal trades (264,447 registered apprentices out of 339,675 at the end of 2011) (Target: 75% by 2013–2014)
    • The Red Seal trades with the largest number of continuing apprentices were Carpenters, Construction Electricians and Automotive Service Technicians.
    • The non-Red Seal trades with the largest numbers of continuing apprentices were Information Technology Support Associates, and Early Childhood Educators.
  • 98% of Red Seal standards were up-to-date in 2012–2013 (Target: 95% by 2016)
  • 100% of Red Seal examinations were up-to-date in 2012–2013 (Target: 95% by 2016)

Explanatory Notes:

The number of trade certificates with a Red endorsement in Red Seal trades is affected by a number of factors.

  • Some trades are only designated in one or two provinces, but are growing in other provinces and territories. For example, Information Technology Support Agent and Early Childhood Educator account for almost one-third of all non-Red Seal apprentices in Canada, but these are only designated trades in Ontario.
  • Quebec does not use the Red Seal examination as a final certification examination for Red Seal designated trades, though the province participates in the Red Seal Program. Quebec’s own provincial certification exams are used with the Red Seal examination typically being seen as a second step for apprentices and certified journeypersons in Quebec who wish to work outside the province.
  • Although Alberta and the Territories use level exams, most apprentices in Red Seal designated trades write the Red Seal examination upon completion of their final level exam.

These factors have been considered in the targets set by the CCDA.

Interprovincial Alliance of Apprenticeship Board Chairs (IPA)

The IPA was established in 1997 and is comprised of Board Chairs of apprenticeship training and certification systems in the provinces and territories. The mandate of the IPA is to foster interprovincial cooperation in industry training by facilitating dialogue and liaising between apprenticeship, trade certification and workplace training systems in the provinces and territories.

By participating in CCDA meetings, IPA members provide significant support and advice to the CCDA on matters related to apprenticeship and the Red Seal Program. The IPA is also represented on various CCDA committees, such as the Stakeholder Relations Committee, the Strategic Initiatives Committee, the Research Committee, and the Communication and Promotion Committee, as well as project-specific groups, such as the CCDA’s Harmonization Task Force.

Major Activities, Initiatives and Accomplishments in 2013—By Strategic Priority

CCDA Strategic Directions 2013–2016

The CCDA’s major activities, initiatives and accomplishments in 2013 are based on the strategic priorities identified in CCDA Strategic Directions 2013–2016. These are outlined below with key results from 2013 highlighted under each priority.

2013–2016 CCDA Strategic Priorities:

  • Standards and Assessments
  • Harmonization
  • Promotion
  • Engagement

Strategic Priority 1
Standards and Assessments

Enhance Red Seal standards and assessments

Strengthening the Red Seal Program

Key Results

  • Established two national advisory committees to pilot new Red Seal Occupational Standard processes and formats in two trades: Construction Electrician and Steamfitter/Pipefitter.
  • Held national workshops with industry representatives, instructors, employers and standards bodies to draft these new standards.
  • Explored opportunities to optimize the Red Seal examinations using features of the new standards.
  • Began drafting an expanded assessment framework for the Red Seal Program.

Under the Strengthening the Red Seal initiative, the CCDA is working closely with industry to explore and test enhancements to the Red Seal Program. Continuous improvement is essential to ensure the program remains rigorous, relevant to industry and labour market demands, and recognized nationally and globally. The CCDA is currently focused on improving occupational standards and exploring enhanced skills assessment. Ongoing stakeholder engagement and support is critical for any changes.

The foundation of the Red Seal Program is the standard it sets, so there is much to be gained by making the standard more robust and valuable. In spring 2013, the CCDA launched a pilot project in two trades: Construction Electrician and Steamfitter/Pipefitter. The pilot will test the format and development processes for the Red Seal standard. New features of the standard will encourage greater consistency in provincial and territorial apprenticeship training and assessment. The addition of learning outcomes and objectives directly within the Red Seal standard will support greater consistency in learning resources, both in classes and during on-the-job training. Other new features of the standard (industry-expected performance, specific evidence of attainment, and identification of critical elements for assessment) may support the development of additional forms of assessment such as practical tests.

Part of the pilot is to examine ways to broaden and increase industry involvement at all stages in the development of the new standard. In spring/summer 2013, a national industry advisory committee was established for each pilot trade to provide added value to each step of the standard’s development process. These committees provided direct input through the situational analysis and standards research in advance of national consultative workshops for each trade. A greater range of industry representatives including tradespeople, employers and instructors were involved in drafting and reviewing the standards. Lessons learned through the pilot projects are expected to form the basis for a wider implementation of an enhanced Red Seal standard.

Work is underway to explore improved assessment models for the Red Seal Program. The current method for assessing tradespeople against the national standard is a multiple-choice examination. In fall/winter 2013, the CCDA explored ways to optimize the existing multiple-choice examination, building on the enhanced standard to ensure it continues to provide an assurance of quality. This may include identifying critical elements that are to be tested in the examination and a more consistent approach to determining the emphasis of testing. Further analysis is underway to determine how these enhancements may be implemented in the future.

The CCDA is also exploring an expanded assessment model that would complement the multiple-choice examination with elements such as a practical test, a structured interview with a trade expert or other forms of evaluation. New assessment elements would be part of a broad and rigorous set of opportunities for workers to demonstrate competency. Options could include the requirement to demonstrate applied competence in key aspects of the trade. Any new assessment tools will continue to be based on standards established by industry, and industry will be consulted to help evaluate the practicality and feasibility of new forms of assessment for their trade, starting with the two pilot trades in the coming year. Whatever changes are piloted in an improved assessment model, the CCDA member jurisdictions have reiterated the importance of continuing to provide only full-scope certifications in the designated Red Seal trades.

Strategic Priority 2
Harmonization

Promote the harmonization of interjurisdictional process and requirements for skilled trades training, certification and standards

Harmonization Initiative

Key Results:

  • Developed an approach to promote the harmonization of apprenticeship training and certification requirements in targeted Red Seal trades.
  • Identified 10 targeted Red Seal trades for review and analysis.
  • Reviewed and analyzed apprenticeship requirements for the first three trades: Carpenter, Mobile Crane Operator and Mobile Crane Operator (Hydraulic).
  • Proposed recommendations and action plans to make requirements in these three trades more consistent.
  • Engaged national industry stakeholders implicated by the first three trades and confirmed their support of the initiative.
  • Started to review and analyze the requirements for the second set of seven trades: Welder, Tower Crane Operator, Heavy Duty Equipment Technician, Metal Fabricator (Fitter), Ironworker (Generalist), Ironworker (Structural/Ornamental), Ironworker (Reinforcing).

Although the Red Seal Program provides common interprovincial standards and examinations, inconsistencies exist among P/T apprenticeship training and certification delivery systems. Within the same trade, there are variations across jurisdictions in the sequencing of technical training content and the required number of on-the-job hours and/or technical training hours. For example, an apprentice in their second level of Carpenter technical training who wishes to move to another P/T to complete their certification may face some challenges as the second and third levels of training are not consistent across the P/Ts.This may result in delays in apprentice training and in the anticipated completion of their programs. At the same time, employers wishing to recruit new apprentices from out-of-province may face attraction barriers as a result of these inconsistencies.

National apprenticeship stakeholders have recognized these issues and have consistently called for the harmonization of apprenticeship training and certification requirements to encourage labour mobility, the employability of apprentices and journeypersons and to ensure all apprentices are trained to the same high quality standard. These concerns were factored into the development of CCDA Strategic Directions 2013–2016.

In May 2013, the CCDA established a Harmonization Task Force to review and analyze jurisdictional training and certification requirements (e.g. on-the-job hours, sequencing of technical training levels, number of levels of training, ratios, etc.) and scope of trades in 10 targeted Red Seal trades. The Harmonization Initiative will identify key differences in requirements among jurisdictions, examine the rationale for these differences, and identify what additional barriers might affect efforts to make them more consistent. The Task Force will develop recommendations for the CCDA on how to make P/T apprenticeship training and certification requirements more consistent in the Red Seal trades. Implicated national industry stakeholders and training providers will be consulted to confirm support of the project and gather input and feedback on the recommendations.

It is expected that work to harmonize requirements will improve the efficiency of the apprenticeship system overall (including the provision of like technical training), facilitate mobility, help to ensure more apprentices complete their training and help employers recruit and train apprentices from across the country.

Next Steps:

In early 2014, the proposed recommendations and action plans for the first three trades will be presented to the CCDA for approval. Consultations will also be held with implicated national industry stakeholders and training providers whose feedback will inform the prioritization of these recommendations and how harmonization is implemented across the jurisdictions.

Going forward, the Harmonization Task Force will complete its review of the second set of seven trades and develop proposed recommendations and action plans to make requirements more consistent. As before the CCDA will engage implicated national industry stakeholders to seek input on proposed priorities for the targeted trades.

Improving Foreign Qualification Recognition (FQR) Processes

Key Results

  • Foundational internal research completed in first half of 2013
  • CCDA FQR Project began in September 2013
  • Development and approval of an Optimal Assessment Process model

The CCDA is working to improve Foreign Qualification Recognition (FQR) in the Red Seal trades for internationally trained workers. The CCDA recognizes that it is important to make sure internationally trained trades workers can use their skills and experience to the fullest extent possible to help meet the ongoing demand for skilled trades workers.

It can be a challenging task to understand, validate and accurately assess the experience and skills obtained outside Canada, especially as trades training varies across countries. It is important that assessment processes are based on high Canadian Red Seal standards while at the same time providing fair access for newcomers and Canadians trained abroad.

Currently, all provinces and territories assess applicants for the Red Seal trades who have been trained outside of Canada. In each jurisdiction, applicants are assessed to make sure that their work experience matches the requirements of the Red Seal trade. If eligible, they are invited to write the Red Seal exam and, once successful, they can become certified. The same process is also used for those people with Canadian experience but who have not been through an apprenticeship program in Canada. Although the assessment processes are similar across Canada, each jurisdiction has a slightly different way of verifying work experience. There are also differences across jurisdictions in terms of the exact exam eligibility and certification requirements.

To address inconsistencies in assessment processes and to make sure that a standard assessment process is timely, fair, transparent and consistent, the CCDA has embarked on a project to identify optimal assessment standards and recognition processes for internationally trained workers. The project is looking at the best practices in each province and territory, as well as drawing upon examples from countries with similar systems, and then combining and adapting these practices to produce an optimal process and standards framework.

Next Steps

In 2014, the task team will be developing and testing the various components of the Optimal Assessment Process. By implementing this model, provinces and territories will be able to help make FQR processpartnerships in to helpes better and more consistent across the country and improve the information that is available to workers before they leave their home country.

Strategic Priority 3
Promotion

Increase awareness of the Red Seal as a competitive advantage and an assurance of quality

Communications and Promotional Activities

Key Results

  • Launched new Red Seal brand
  • Distributed two editions of the Red Seal e-Newsletter, 110,000+ Red Seal brochures, 8,000+ posters and 9,000+ kit folders
  • Published the 2012 CCDA Annual Report, summarizing activities and accomplishments
  • Responded to approximately 850 telephone messages through the Red Seal Info Line and 2,500+ emails
  • Distributed more than 670 National Occupational Analyses to inform skilled workers what they “must know and be able to do” to be competent in a Red Seal trade.

Promotion of the Red Seal Program

With the assistance of its various committees, the CCDA continued to develop and maintain strong ties with key apprenticeship stakeholders and partners to ensure support of the Red Seal Program as industry’s standard of excellence for the skilled trades. Through its enhanced CCDA Communications Strategy, the CCDA is moving forward with strategies aimed at increasing awareness of the Red Seal Program among employers, apprentices, journeypersons, students, educators, and consumers.

Strategic Communication Initiative

New Red Seal Branding

To continue to have the Red Seal Program recognized as a standard of excellence for skilled trades among apprentices, industry, partners and the general public, the CCDA concluded its work on the new Red Seal brand.

As part of the rebranding exercise, a new marketing and promotional logo was developed for the program and the program’s communication tools were completely made over to reflect the program’s new look.

The new Red Seal brand was officially launched in June 2013 at the Skills Canada competition in Vancouver.

2013 Red Seal Award of Excellence

The Red Seal Award of Excellence (RSAE) is awarded biannually to an individual who has made outstanding contributions to the development and promotion of apprenticeship training in Canada.

In 2013, the RSAE was awarded to two recipients, Mr. Rick Ewen and Mr. Joe Black.

Mr. Ewen was presented his award at the CCDA Fall meeting in Ottawa. The former Executive Director of the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC), Mr. Ewen promoted apprenticeship and trade certification as a means to a successful and productive career. Spending countless hours promoting apprenticeship, both professionally and as a volunteer, he has served as a strong advocate for training and certification for the skilled trades and continues to use his trade knowledge, skills and talents within industry and the apprenticeship system.

Mr. Joe Black, former CEO of the Saskatchewan Apprenticeship and Trade Certification Commission (SATCC), was also awarded the 2013 Red Seal Award of Excellence for his passion for, commitment to, and engagement in apprenticeship and trade certification. Mr. Black is a firm believer in the industry-led model of apprenticeship and encourages stakeholder partnerships in to help apprentices and tradespeople meet the industry-defined standards for trade certification. Mr. Black was not able to attend the award presentation in October, but will be recognized at the next CCDA meeting in 2014.

Outreach Activities

The Red Seal Program was promoted through a variety of outreach activities during the past year. The value and importance of the skilled trades and the Red Seal Program was presented to numerous educators, students, employers and industry stakeholders via the Red Seal kiosk and promotional materials.

The kiosk travelled to four national events in 2013:

  • Cannexus—an event hosted by the Canadian Education and Research Institute for Counselling (Ottawa, ON)
  • Skills Canada National Competition (Vancouver, BC)
  • Workforce One-Stop (Toronto, ON)
  • Newcomers Canada Fair (Toronto, ON)

The Red Seal kiosk was also exhibited at the following regional and local events:

  • Ottawa Integrated Local Labour Market Planning (OILLMP) Construction Career Fair (Ottawa, ON)
  • 2013 Winnipeg Rotary Career Symposium (Winnipeg, MB)
  • Builder for a Day (Gatineau, QC)
  • 2013 HortEast Trade Expo (Moncton, NB)
  • Provincial Apprenticeship Summit (Moncton, NB)
  • Cité Collégiale—Soirée Portes ouvertes (Ottawa, ON)

Red Seal Website

The Red Seal website is the CCDA’s primary communications portal for the Red Seal Program. All Red Seal promotional materials are designed to drive requests for information to the website. The site provides a directory of information resources, including National Occupational Analyses (NOAs), sample examination questions and links to provincial and territorial apprenticeship authorities. It also provides information on P/T apprenticeship systems, including the Ellis Chart. Other Red Seal products, including the CCDA Annual Reports and Red Seal e-Newsletters are available on the website in alternate formats.

From January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013, the Red Seal website had over 485,000 visitors, resulting in about 2,050,000 page views.

Since August 2013, the CCDA has been developing a new revamped website using the new Red Seal branding. The website will be redesigned and revamped based on a new Web standards in order to optimize the website and Web applications for mobile devices.

Strategic Priority 4
Engagement

Enhance collaboration of federal–provincial–territorial governments, partners and industry in Red Seal and apprenticeship promotional activities to maximize impact.

Stakeholder Relations

Key Results

  • Engaged national apprenticeship stakeholders at the annual stakeholder meeting. The meeting was designed to inform stakeholders about CCDA Strategic Directions 2013–2016, to gather feedback. It also served to provide an update on key initiatives and the opportunity to discuss next steps.
  • Consulted with several stakeholder groups on key initiatives, including Strengthening the Red Seal, Foreign Qualification Recognition and Harmonization.

As the Red Seal is an industry-driven program, the CCDA builds and sustains effective relationships with key national stakeholder groups. An ongoing dialogue with apprenticeship stakeholders is crucial to realizing the vision of the Red Seal as the standards program of choice based on the value it represents to industry, apprentices and participating jurisdictions. The CCDA recognizes that dialogue with stakeholders is beneficial and necessary to ensure that the Red Seal Program continues to be responsive to labour market needs. To that end, CCDA representatives meet annually with a cross-section of national apprenticeship stakeholders to provide updates, seek input and hold interactive discussions on key initiatives and strategic priorities.

In March 2013, the CCDA held its annual meeting with national apprenticeship stakeholders in Ottawa. Participants confirmed that the CCDA’s 2013–2016 strategic priorities were on the right track and emphasized the importance of working to harmonize training and certification requirements to better facilitate apprentice mobility. Overall, stakeholders were supportive of an enhanced standards model and exploring an assessment framework which may lead to additional forms of assessment. Stakeholders reiterated the importance of upholding the rigour of the Red Seal and emphasized strong industry involvement to develop cost-effective and standardized practical assessments. Participants also stressed the importance of common certification processes and practical assessments for internationally-trained trades workers. Participants highlighted that employer participation is key to apprenticeship training and completion. Participant stakeholders also reaffirmed the importance of continued stakeholder engagement and communication on the CCDA’s strategic priorities and key initiatives.

Throughout the year, CCDA representatives consulted with stakeholders on key initiatives and also attended meetings with individual stakeholder groups. For the Strengthening the Red Seal initiative, National Industry Advisory committees were established to provide guidance and feedback for the Construction Electrician and Steamfitter-Pipefitter enhanced standards development pilots.

With respect to the CCDA’s Harmonization project, preliminary discussions were held with national stakeholders associated with the first three targeted trades (Carpenter, Mobile Crane Operator, and Mobile Crane Operator [Hydraulic]). The purpose was to discuss the objectives, outcomes of the research, and garner support for the Harmonization initiative. The review identified these barriers to apprentice mobility: provincial/territorial variations in the sequencing of the content of apprenticeship technical training, and variations in the number of on-the-job and in-school hours required. A proposed action plan will be discussed with implicated national industry stakeholders in February 2014 in order to prioritize harmonization. Stakeholder engagement by the CCDA at the national level complements the engagement of industry stakeholders by the provincial and territorial apprenticeship authorities in their respective jurisdictions.

Major Activities, Initiatives and Accomplishments in 2013—By Main Business Line

Red Seal Product Development

Key Results

To ensure Red Seal products remain up-to-date, the following activities were undertaken in 2013:

  • National Occupational Analysis (NOA) development
  • Examination development
  • Interprovincial Program Guide (IPG) development

Interprovincial Standards and Examination Committee (ISEC) Activities

The CCDA Interprovincial Standards and Examination Committee (ISEC) is responsible for the development and maintenance of National Occupational Analyses (NOAs), Interprovincial Red Seal Examinations, and Interprovincial Program Guides. ISEC consults with industry across Canada to plan and prioritize development activities and works closely with trade stakeholders to generate tools that reflect current trade practices and training requirements.

National Occupational Analyses

The National Occupational Analyses (NOAs) set the standards for Red Seal trades. Each trade’s NOA organizes the activities performed by that trade, the knowledge required to do trade tasks, and the competencies that must be demonstrated. In 2013, NOA revisions were initiated in 10 trades. Two of these trades, Gasfitter – Class A and Gasfitter – Class B, were for newly designated trades. Over the past year, eight new NOAs were published on the Red Seal website.

Key Results

  • NOA development workshops were held for 10 trades:
    • Carpenter
    • Industrial Mechanic (Millwright)
    • Instrumentation and Control Technician
    • Gasfitter – Class A
    • Gasfitter – Class B
    • Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic
    • Welder
    • Machinist
    • Automotive Painter
    • Motor Vehicle Body Repairer
  • Eight NOAs were published during the year:
    • Powerline Technician
    • Mobile Crane Operator
    • Transport Trailer Technician
    • Machinist
    • Drywall Finisher and Plasterer
    • Carpenter
    • Industrial Mechanic (Millwright)
    • Instrumentation and Control Technician

Interprovincial Program Guides

Each Interprovincial Program Guide (IPG) outlines the minimum common core content for the development of jurisdictional training standards and curricula. They allow for greater consistency in apprenticeship training and transparency in standards. IPGs can be downloaded from the Red Seal website.

Key Results

  • Two IPG development workshops were held in 2013:
    • Sprinkler System Installer (workshop)
    • Cook (revision)
  • Two IPG booklets were published:
    • Sheet Metal Worker
    • Automotive Service Technician

Examination Development

Red Seal examinations are used to determine whether apprentices and experienced tradespeople meet the Canadian Red Seal standards. All Red Seal examinations are developed with the assistance of industry trade experts.

Key Results

  • Eight item bank development workshops were held. In 2014 and early 2015, it is expected that new examinations will be released for the following Red Seal trades:
    • Agricultural Equipment Technician
    • Boilermaker
    • Metal Fabricator (Fitter)
    • Powerline Technician
    • Recreation Vehicle Service Technician
    • Rig Technician
    • Roofer
    • Transport Trailer Technician
  • Nine Red Seal trades had new examinations released in 2013 totalling 29 new examinations as each trade has several examinations developed:
    • Automotive Service Technician
    • Baker
    • Floorcovering Installer
    • Insulator (Heat and Frost)
    • Lather (Interior Systems Mechanic)
    • Mobile Crane Operator (Hydraulic)
    • Motorcycle Mechanic
    • Painter and Decorator
    • Tower Crane Operator

Essential Skills and Apprenticeship Initiative

The Essential Skills and Apprenticeship Initiative began in 2007 to support the integration of essential skills into apprenticeship programs, trades training and related services. Through the initiative a series of essential skills resources were developed specifically for the skilled trades. Since their release in 2009, the overall uptake has been strong with over half a million requests for copies. While the resources are being used across the country, the CCDA is now expanding its efforts to support provincial and territorial governments and other key stakeholders to advance their interests to fully focus on fully integrating essential skills training into related apprenticeship programming.

Key Results

In 2013, the CCDA undertook the following activities.

  • Engaged in activities to address recommendations from the 2012 program review including:
    • Developed a communications strategy to increase awareness of the importance of essential skills in apprenticeship and trades training and to support intermediaries to learn more about available resources to integrate essential skills into their programming;
    • Held knowledge sharing events such as a webinar on Improving Apprentices’ Success in Training and on the Job, which had over 150 registered participants from across Canada; and
    • Initiated the development of an inventory of essential skills and apprenticeship activities to build knowledge on how provinces and territories are integrating essential skills in their jurisdictions.
  • Developed the Essential Skills and Apprenticeship 2013–2016 Strategic Plan to support increased completion and certification of skilled trade workers. The plan highlights key priorities which include:
    • Conduct research to build knowledge of the benefits of investing in essential skills in apprenticeship and the trades, and;
    • Build capacity building of intermediaries such as educators, trainers, advisors, employment counsellors, and of employers to identify essential skills issues, provide support and/or integrate into training.
  • Activities planned for the upcoming year will focus on the first priority to build the knowledge base to develop the business case and identify resources that can support the integration of essential skills into practice
  • Disseminated essential skills resources online through the Red Seal website and at a variety of national conferences and events. In 2013, almost 31,000 print copies were distributed and there were more than 40,000 online page views for essential skills information

Policy and Innovation

Research Activities

Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS)—2011 Data

On June 11, 2013, Statistics Canada released the 2011 RAIS data through a series of CANSIM tables. This release was accompanied by an article in The Daily highlighting the main findings of the data.

  • In 2011, there were almost 90,000 new registrations in apprenticeship programs, about 4,000 (or 4.5%) more than in 2010. New registrations in Red Seal trades represented 71% of all new registrations in 2011.
  • More than 41,000 apprentices completed their programs in 2011, about 5,000 (or 14.3%) more than the previous year. Completions in Red Seal trades represented 76.1% of all completions in 2011, for a total of 31,305.
  • Over 339,000 apprentices were registered in apprenticeship programs at the end of 2011, an increase of 3.8% from 2010. Almost four out of every five of these apprentices were in Red Seal trades.
  • In 2011, women accounted for 14% of all apprentices. While female apprentices continue to cluster in the Hairstylist, Cook, and Baker Red Seal trades, in 2011 more women registered in some male dominated trades such as Heavy Equipment Operator (72 vs. 36 in 2010), Industrial Electrician (279 vs. 246 in 2010) and Construction Craft Worker (258 vs. 231 in 2010) trades in 2011.
  • The average age of new registrants in 2011 was 28 years old. Sixty-seven percent of newly-registered apprentices in 2011 were under 30 years old, 2% more than in 2010.

Youth Attitudes towards the Trades—2012 Program for International Student Assessment (PISA)

The CCDA’s multi-year Research Plan seeks to better understand the pathways to apprenticeship and the level of awareness of apprenticeship among high school students. The CCDA’s Research committee helped Employment and Social Development Canada, with the involvement of the Council of Ministers of Education (Canada), to develop a module administered in Canada through the 2012 Program for the International Student Assessment to provide information on opinions and awareness of youth regarding careers in the trades.

Statistical Information

Red Seal Statistics

Top 10 Red Seal Trades—By Number of Red Seal Endorsements Issued in 2013

1 Construction Electrician 4,334
2 Automotive Service Technician 1,803
3 Plumber 1,684
4 Carpenter 1,659
5 Welder 1,645
6 Truck and Transport Mechanic 1,081
7 Heavy Duty Equipment Technician 981
8 Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) 981
9 Steamfitter/Pipefitter 787
10 Hairstylist 650

Top 10 Red Seal Trades—Trades with the Most Red Seal Endorsements Issued (Since Inception)

1 Construction Electrician 103,576
2 Automotive Service Technician 86,990
3 Carpenter 46,931
4 Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) 40,057
5 Plumber 35,704
6 Welder 35,515
7 Heavy Duty Equipment Technician 34,641
8 Cook 26,843
9 Steamfitter/Pipefitter 20,493
10 Truck and Transport Mechanic 16,775

Total Number of Red Seal Endorsements Issued—By Province/Territory

Provinces and Territories Since Inception 2013**
Total Apprentice Trade Qualifier
1 Alberta 175,269 6,514 5,638 876
2 Ontario 171,844 4,480 2,901 1,579
3 British Columbia 105,084 4,583 3,488 1,095
4 Saskatchewan 32,132 1,658 1,449 209
5 Manitoba 31,815 1,248 1,011 237
6 Nova Scotia 24,920 848 600 248
7 New Brunswick 24,567 855 589 266
8 Newfoundland and Labrador 20,484 662 542 120
9 Prince Edward Island 3,861 140 90 50
10 Quebec 2,147 79 79 0
11 Yukon 1,793 60 39 20
12 Northwest Territories 1,438 42 35 7
13 Nunavut* 58 6 N/A N/A
595,412 21,175

* Nunavut began issuing Red Seals on their own certificates during the 2001 calendar year.

**Calendar year

NOTE: The first Red Seal endorsements were issued in 1959 to apprentices that successfully completed the interprovincial examination in the trade now known as Automotive Service Technician

Figure 1—Overview of Registered Apprentices in Red Seal Trades 1991–2011

This chart is an Overview of the Registered Apprentices in the Red Seal Trades from 1991-2011.

Statistical Profiles

The Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS) is an annual survey conducted by Statistics Canada since 1974. The purpose of the survey is to gather information from provinces and territories on individuals who receive training or certification within a trade where apprenticeship training is being offered. Results from the 2011 RAIS were released in June 2013.

In 2011, Red Seal trades accounted for approximately 80% of registered apprentices. There were 63,609 new registrations in Red Seal trades, an increase of 6.5% compared to 2010, and 31,305 apprenticeship completions, an increase of 6.4% over 2010.

As indicated in Figure 1, there were 63,609 new apprenticeship registrations in Red Seal trades in 2011, an increase of 6.5% from the previous year. The table below shows the number of new registrations for the top ten Red Seal trades in 2011. New registration in these ten trades accounted for over two-thirds (65%) of all new apprenticeship registrations in Red Seal trades in 2011.

Also, in Figure 1, overall apprenticeship completions in Red Seal trades grew 6.4% from 29,421 in 2010 to 31,305 in 2011.

The table below shows the number of apprenticeship completions for the top ten Red Seal trades in 2011. Almost three-quarters (69%) of apprenticeship completions in Red Seal trades were in these ten trades.

Top 10 Red Seal Trade Registrations in 2011
Trade 2011
Carpenter 9,075
Construction Electrician 8,757
Hairstylist 4,302
Automotive Service Technician 3,612
Welder 3,360
Plumber 3,051
Cook 2,523
Heavy Duty Equipment Technician 2,427
Steamfitter/Pipefitter 2,358
Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) 1,938
(Total) Top 10 Red Seal Trades 41,403
(Total) New Registrations in all Red Seal Trades 63,609
Top 10 Red Seal Trade Apprenticeship Completions 2011
Trade 2011
Construction Electrician 5,346
Carpenter 3,999
Hairstylist 2,400
Automotive Service Technician 2,058
Plumber 1,983
Welder 1,692
Industrial Mechanic (Millwright) 1,194
Heavy Duty Equipment Technician 1,155
Steamfitter/Pipefitter 1,068
Truck and Transport Mechanic 858
(Total) Top 10 Red Seal Trades 21,753
(Total) Completions in all Red Seal Trades 31,305

Figure 2—Participation of Women in Red Seal Trades 1991–2011

This chart shows the participation of women in the Red Seal Trades from 1991-2011.

Figure 2 shows that the participation of women in Red Seal trades has remained fairly steady with respect to completions and new registrations from 2010 while continuing apprentices increased by 4.8% to 25,083 compared to 2010. Since 1991, the number of females registering in Red Seal trades has more than quadrupled (from 1,797 to 7,035), the number of continuing female apprentices increased five-fold (from 4,845 to 25,083), and the number of female apprenticeship completers almost tripled from 1,089 to 3,216.

Figure 3—Age and Gender of New Apprenticeship Registrants in 2011

Age and Gender

In 2011, the median age of new apprenticeship registrants in Red Seal trades was 24 for males and 22 for females. Males made up 89% (56,574) of all new registrations, while females represented the remaining 11% (7,035). Almost three-quarters (72.5%) of all new apprenticeship registrants in Red Seal trades were under the age of 30.

Number of Registered Apprentices in the Red Seal Trades in Canada in 2011

This map chart demonstrates in red the number of newly registered apprentices in the Red Seal Trades in 2011 and in blue the number of active apprentices in the Red Seal Trades in 2011. The information is sourced from the Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS), 2011.

Number of Registered Apprentices in Red Seals Trades in Canada in 2011
Number of Newly Registered Apprentices in Red Seal Trades in 2011 Number of Active Apprentices in Red Seal Trades in 2011
Newfoundland and Labrador 1,284 5,166
Prince Edward Island 234 978
Nova Scotia 1,281 5,247
New Brunswick 1,137 4,083
Quebec 13,800 57,567
Ontario 16,833 94,443
Manitoba 2202 8,283
Saskatchewan 2,580 9,162
Alberta 16,023 54,354
British Columbia 8,001 24,336
Yukon 102 462
Northwest Territories 117 267
Nunavut 18 105
Canada 63,612 264,453

Fast Facts: Interprovincial Standards Red Seal Program

  • Established to develop occupational standards in the 1950s.
  • 595,411 Red Seals issued since examinations began in 1959.
  • 459,275 Red Seals issued to apprentices since inception.
  • 136,136 Red Seals issued to trade qualifiers or challengers since inception.
  • Over 222,000 Red Seals issued in the last 10 years.
  • 55 designated Red Seal Trades.
  • At the end of 2011, apprentices in Red Seal trades represented 80% of all registered apprentices in Canada.
  • Updated Essential Skills profiles have been created for 29 of the Red Seal trades.
  • 34,936 Red Seal examinations written in 2013.
  • 20,241 Apprentices wrote Red Seal examinations in 2013—79% pass rate.
  • 8,291 Trade Qualifiers wrote Red Seal examinations in 2013—65% pass rate.
  • 21,449 Red Seal examinations completed successfully in 2013—61% pass rate.
  • 21,174 Red Seals issued in 2013.
  • Top 5 Red Seal trades (by number of endorsements issued in 2013):
    • Construction Electrician
    • Automotive Service Technician
    • Plumber
    • Carpenter
    • Welder
  • Nunavut joined the program in 1999 and Quebec joined it in 1971. All other jurisdictions have participated since 1952.

Members of the CCDA for 2013

Newfoundland & Labrador

Mr. Cliff Mercer, Director

Apprenticeship and Trades Certification Division
Department of Advanced Education and Skills
Confederation Building, 1st Floor, West Block
100 Prince Philip Drive
St. John's, NL  A1B 3R4

Prince Edward Island

Mr. Grant Sweet, Manager of Apprenticeship

Post-Secondary and Continuing Education
Department of Innovation and Advanced Learning
Atlantic Technology Centre, Suite 212
P.O. Box 2000, 90 University Ave.
Charlottetown, PE  C1A 7N8

Nova Scotia (Acting-Chair of the CCDA)

Mr. Joe Rudderham, Director

Apprenticeship Training Division
Department of Labour and Advanced Education
2021 Brunswick Street, P.O. Box 578
Halifax, NS  B3J 2S9

New Brunswick

Ms. Wendy Maher, Acting Director

Manager of Program Delivery
Apprenticeship and Occupational Certification
Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labour
Chestnut Complex, PO Box 6000
470 York Street
Fredericton, NB  E3B 5H1

Quebec

Ms. Élise Martel, Director

Direction de la qualification réglementée
Emploi-Québec

800, Tour de la Place Victoria, 27th Floor
Montreal, QC  H4Z 1B7

Ontario

Mr. Royden Trainor, Director

Policy and Programs
Ontario College of Trades
655 Bay Street, Suite 600
Toronto, ON  M5G 2K4

Manitoba

Ms. Alisa Ramrattan, Executive Director

Manitoba Jobs and the Economy
111 Lombard Avenue, suite 100
Winnipeg, MB  R3B 0T4

Saskatchewan

Mr. Jeff Ritter, Chief Executive Officer

Saskatchewan Apprenticeship & Trade Certification Commission
2140 Hamilton Street
Regina, SK  S4P 2E3

Alberta (Vice-Chair of the CCDA)

Mr. Mark Douglas, Executive Director

Apprenticeship and Industry Training
Policy and Standards Enterprise and Advanced Education
10th Floor, Commerce Place
10155-102 Street NW
Edmonton, AB  T5J 4L5

British Columbia

Mr. Gary Herman, Acting Chief Executive Officer

Industry Training Authority
800 - 8100 Granville Avenue
Richmond, BC  V6Y 3T6

Yukon

Ms. Judy Thrower, Director

Training Programs, Advanced Education Branch
Department of Education
Government of Yukon
P.O. Box 2703
Whitehorse, YT  Y1A 2C6

Northwest Territories

Ms. Angela Littlefair, Manager

Apprenticeship and Occupational Certification
Education, Culture & Employment
Box 1320
Yellowknife, NT  X1A 2L9

Nunavut

Mr. David Lloyd, Assistant Deputy Minister

Department of Education
P.O. Box 1000, Stn 980
Iqaluit, NU  X0A 0H0

Employment and Social Development Canada

Ms. Caroline Fradette, Director
Ms. Jessica Gibbs, Manager Program Analysis

Trades and Apprenticeship
Employment and Social Development Canada
140 Promenade du Portage, Phase IV; 5th Floor
Gatineau, QC  K1A 0J9

Appendix A: CCDA Governance Structure

This chart shows the CCDA Governance Structure.

Appendix B: Overview of the 2013–2016 Strategic Directions

Strategic Priority 1 – Standards and Assessments

Enhance Red Seal standards and assessments

  • Develop and implement enhanced standards that meet current and future needs of industry for the skilled trades
  • Continue to explore multiple assessment approaches to adapt to the evolving needs of the labour market while maintaining the rigour of the Red Seal Program
  • Redefine criteria for designating and de-designating Red Seal trades, and review the renewal cycle for Red Seal products.

Strategic Priority 2 – Harmonization

Promote the harmonization of interjurisdictional processes and requirements for skilled trades training, certification and standards

  • Develop and advocate the adoption of more common approaches and tools for the assessment and recognition of the experience and credentials of domestic and foreign trained workers
  • Identify areas where there are significant differences in the scope of trades and training and certification requirements between jurisdictions to encourage harmonization.

Strategic Priority 3 – Promotion

Increase awareness of the Red Seal as a competitive advantage and an assurance of quality

  • Create and implement a new branding strategy for the Red Seal Program, focused on its value in a post-AIT context
  • Enhance collaboration of federal-provincial-territorial governments, partners and industry in Red Seal and apprenticeship promotional activities to maximize impact.

Strategic Priority 4 – Engagement

Increase the engagement and participation of partners and stakeholders in the Red Seal Program

  • Build upon existing strategies to further engage national industry in the Red Seal Program and the CCDA’s activities.

Appendix C: CCDA/Red Seal Program Logic Model

 CCDA / Red Seal Program: Logic Model and Performance Measurement Strategy

Note: the Logic Model and Performance Measurement Strategy are based on the CCDA’s/Red Seal Program’s main business lines, which represent the ongoing work to deliver the Program. Additional work is undertaken on strategic priorities, which are outlined in the CCDA’s Strategic Directions 2013–16. Efforts have been made to make the performance measurement strategy as realistic as possible recognizing that governments are under increasing fiscal pressures, and to allow for sufficient flexibility to focus on the CCDA’s strategic priorities. In some cases, the targets may be lower than the current baseline numbers with this in mind. In other cases, the baselines and targets need to be established as the performance measures are new.

Logic Model

Business Lines

Standards and Examinations Development and Maintenance

Research

Communication and Engagement

Ultimate
Outcome

The Red Seal Program contributes to a certified, highly competent, and mobile skilled trades workforce in Canada.

Intermediate Outcome

Jurisdictions make use of the Red Seal standards and examinations.

The CCDA has evidence-based research to support approaches to apprenticeship training and certification that respond to labour market needs.

Stakeholders value and support the Red Seal Program.

Immediate Outcome

Jurisdictions have access to Red Seal standards and examinations that reflect the skills and knowledge requirements of the Canadian labour market.

Jurisdictions are provided with research that addresses knowledge and information gaps related to the skilled trades and apprenticeship to inform decision making.

Jurisdictions, industry groups and other apprenticeship stakeholders are provided with the tools to increase the awareness of the Red Seal Program in Canada.

Outputs

  • Red Seal products, e.g. National Occupational Analyses, Red Seal Examinations
  • Interprovincial Program Guides
  • Essential skills tools and resources
  • Policies and Procedures
  • Training materials
  • Evergreen multi-year research agenda
  • Research reports
  • Statistical and other analysis
  • Research capacity in jurisdictions
  • Partnerships and information- sharing through joint research activities
  • Promotional materials
  • Communications plan and products
  • Red Seal newsletter to stakeholders
  • Stakeholder engagement strategy
  • Red Seal Awards of Excellence
  • CCDA Annual Reports

Activities

  • Develop and maintain industry-driven standards
  • Develop and maintain examinations based upon the standards
  • Train jurisdictional staff
  • Develop and maintain policies and procedures for delivering the Red Seal Program
  • Develop a multi-year research agenda
  • Conduct the research
  • Promote the Red Seal Program
  • Engage national stakeholders
  • Maintain the Red Seal Program website with informational and promotional materials
  • Report on Program results

Performance Measurement Strategy

Outcomes

Performance Indicators

TargetsNote 1

Information Source

Reporting Frequency

Reporting Responsibility

Ultimate Outcomes

The Red Seal Program contributes to a certified, highly competent, and mobile skilled trades workforce in Canada.

Percentage of Red Seal endorsements on trade certificates in Red Seal skilled trades across Canada

65% by 2016
(Baseline: 63.1% in 2010)
(24,957 Trade Certificates with a Red Seal endorsement in Red Seal trades)

Registered Apprenticeship Information System (RAIS), Statistics Canada

Annual with two year time lag due to data availability

Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC)

Intermediate Outcomes

Jurisdictions make use of the Red Seal standards and examinations.

Percentage of registered apprentices in the Red Seal trades

75% by 2013–14
(Baseline: 79% in 2010)
(259,977 registered apprentices in the Red Seal trades).

RAIS

Annual with two year time lag due to data availability

ESDC

The CCDA has evidence-based research to support approaches to apprenticeship training and certification that respond to labour market needs.

Percentage of CCDA members that are satisfied with the CCDA supported and generated research on skilled trades and apprenticeship.

Baseline will be established in 2014, which will inform the target.

Questionnaire of CCDA members
(the denominator is pre-identified)

Annual

ESDC
(with input from CCDA members)

Stakeholders value and support the Red Seal Program.

Percentage of stakeholders that value the Red Seal Program.

Baseline will be established in 2014, which will inform the target.

New electronic questionnaire to be administered to a cross-section of stakeholders, following the national stakeholder meeting.

Annual

ESDC/CCDA Stakeholder Relations Committee

Immediate Outcomes

The jurisdictions have access to Red Seal standards and examinations that reflect the skills and knowledge requirements of the Canadian labour market.

Percentage of Red Seal standards and examinations that are up-to-date according to the established service standards.

Standards: 95% by 2016
(Baseline: 97% based on an average of the past five years, 2007–08 to 2011–12)
Examinations: 95% by 2016
(Baseline: 80% based on an average of the past five years, 2007–08 to 2011–12).

Service Standards Report
(each trade is evaluated every four years)

Twice a year

ESDC/
CCDA Interprovincial Standards and Examinations Committee

Jurisdictions are provided with research that addresses knowledge and information gaps related to the skilled trades and apprenticeship to inform decision making.

Percentage of achievement of projects and activities identified in the CCDA research plan.

Baseline will be established in 2014, which will inform the target Note 2.

CCDA multi-year research plan and CCDA Research Committee updates to the CCDA

Annual

ESDC/CCDA Research Committee

Jurisdictions, industry groups and other apprenticeship stakeholders are provided with the tools to increase the awareness of the Red Seal Program in Canada.

Percentage of jurisdictions utilizing key Red Seal promotional tools.

Baseline will be established in 2014, which will inform the target.

Questionnaire of CCDA members on the use of key Red Seal promotional tools
(to be identified annually)

Annual

ESDC/CCDA Communication/ Promotion Committee

Footnotes

1

Targets for the use of the Red Seal Program take into account that Quebec does not use the Red Seal examination as a final certification examination for a designated Red Seal trade, but rather, uses its own provincial certification exams. Although Quebec apprentices represent approximately 20% of registered apprentices in designated trades in Canada, less than 1% of certificates with a Red Seal endorsement are issued.Thus, the targets set by the CCDA, for example, the target of 65% of Red Seal endorsements on trade certificates in Red Seal trades by 2016, are influenced by the various apprenticeship systems and challenges based on data collection.

Return to the reference for note 1

2

Target, once established, will allow sufficient flexibility to respond to research opportunities throughout the year which may not be reflected in the CCDA multi-year research plan.

Return to the reference for note 2

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